1. Bay Area Food Drive for Farm Workers – Monday, June 2nd until noon on Friday, June 13th

2. Bitter Brew: The Stirring Reality of Coffee

3. Our article to appear in South African children’s textbook

4. In case you missed it!

Thanks to all of you who donated in response to our fundraising appeal! It means a lot to us. And for those who want to contribute but haven’t yet done so, please send your support today! We are planning our next strategies and count on your support for our programs.



1. Bay Area Food Drive for Farm Workers – Monday, June 2nd until noon on Friday, June 13th

We’re participating in a student-led coalition organizing a Farm Worker Appreciation Day in Salinas, CA on June 15! As part of this effort, F.E.P. is coordinating a food donation drive for farm workers. Help support and thank the people who pick your food!

Please see our list of foods we are accepting.

There are drop-off locations in Berkeley, Marin, Oakland, San Francisco, and San José. Check out the Facebook page for the event.



2. Bitter Brew: The Stirring Reality of Coffee

The newest food issue on the F.E.P. website highlights the human, animal, and environmental costs of coffee and offers suggestions for identifying the most ethical sources for this beloved morning beverage.

Learn more about the power of your choices when it comes to buying and consuming coffee.


3. Our article to appear in South African children’s textbook

Textbook containing extracts from Slavery in the Chocolate IndustryWe are thrilled that extracts from our online article “Slavery in the Chocolate Industry” is being published in a textbook that will be distributed to children throughout South Africa.

The publisher, Macmillan South Africa, tells us that many of the children receiving this textbook come from disadvantaged backgrounds. We are always delighted when our work is recognized on an international scale, but we are particularly thrilled that school children who themselves have experienced tremendous injustice will see that child labor is an issue people care about and want to stop.


4. In case you missed it!

Some links to check out:

shame on albertsons

WHAT YOU CAN DO

Please sign and share the petition to Safeway/Albertsons’ CEO Vivek Sankaran right now and tell him that all neighborhoods need access to fresh food!

Please sign our friends, at Birchwood Food Desert Fighters, petition to Albertsons, asking them to remove ALL grocery noncompete clauses affecting the Park Manor Shopping Center.

Call Safeway to complain:
1-877-Safeway
(1-877-723-3929). *

Call Albertsons to complain:
1-877-848-6483.*

Call Safeway to complain:
1-877-Safeway
(1-877-723-3929). *

Call Albertsons to complain:
1-877-848-6483.*

* Suggested language and details: Please make a polite phone call and keep in mind the person you are speaking to probably has no idea about this policy—most people don’t. You just need to stay on the line for a customer service representative. For Safeway, they will ask you for your full name and phone number and if you have a Safeway card number.
 
Suggested language: “I am calling to log a comment against a Safeway / Albertsons policy that sometimes puts restrictive deeds on its former properties and prevents other grocery stores from moving in, sometimes for 10 years or more. This has impacted community health. I would like Safeway / Albertsons to end this policy immediately.”
 

If they ask questions you cannot answer, feel free to provide our email: info@foodispower.org and remind them you are calling because you disagree with this practice.

Order some of our leaflets to share with others by emailing info(at)foodispower.org.

 
 

Join us by taking a stand in front of your local Safeway / Albertsons! Find a demo to attend here.

Want to organize your own demo? We can send you leaflets and posters. Contact us here for additional details.

 
 
Take action on social media with hashtag #ShameOnSafeway & #ShameOnAlbertsons and tagging Safeway & Albertsons.

Thank you for wanting to take a stand against a corporation that is impacting the health of Black and Brown communities and low-income neighborhoods.

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